Salesforce.com and the Site.com Content Management System – Part 3

Part 1 and Part 2 of this series was about how to create a simple site in the Salesforce.com Site.com Content Management System.

I left the Publish part for Part 3, since this can be a discrete action that a business may want to execute in isolation from the content generation.

You probably want to have a look at the simple ‘Site Configuration’ panel, which will give you some options around ‘click jacking’ (preventing the rendering of your site in an iFrame from another site), as well as allowing you to set the HTML files that will be used for the default ‘Home’ page as well as the ‘404 Not Found’ page.

‘Enable Anonymous Preview’ is useful if you want to test from a variety of devices.

Screen Shot 2015-07-21 at 11.34.15 AM

There are a few more panels which provide the ability to:

  • Custom properties : Constant values that could be reused throughout the site, such as a phone number
  • Branding properties : Expressions for use in Stylesheets
  • IP Restrictions : Restrict access to specific assets in your site based on an IP range
  • URL Redirects : Single place to manage redirects
  • User Roles : All users with access to Site.com will be listed here already
  • Languages : Add other languages variants to your site

Unfortunately my Developer edition does not allow publishing as part of the licensing, however if I had another edition then I would see a ‘Publish Changes…‘ button on the toolbar. (Note to Salesforce: Why not just have the button disabled? Hiding it makes no sense at all).

You should then be able to see your site published. The following screenshots are cheating, since I am just using Preview, but it should look exactly the same.

previewdesktop

iphone

It is also important to note that you can duplicate and export entire sites, so it is possible to experiment as much as you like in your developer instance and later export to production when you are ready.

Site.com manages basic web hosting quite effectively. It is not versatile enough for complex web hosting, and in a way it is probably a good thing because at this level of functionality it is possible to give business users a direct method to publish content.

I would still probably advise a technical administrator actually oversees the process however, since you are restricted to 25 sites, which means inevitably you will get reuse, deletions and overwriting of existing content.

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